In official or composed English, usage there are, since the subject match is plural.

You are watching: A lot of people

But in talked English (or writing/reporting dialogue, or writing an extremely informally such together on social media posts), there's is fine. Many (probably most) indigenous English speaker say there's in spoken English.

Edit: I had a complete brain fart once I composed this and also didn't twig the possible inconsistency between formal and notional agreement.

OP, girlfriend could likewise use singular or plural relying on whether you perceive "a most people" to be a singular mass comprising many people, or whether you perceive "a the majority of people" come be countless plural individuals.


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level 2
· 3y

OP, girlfriend could additionally use singular or plural depending upon whether girlfriend perceive "a many people" to be a singular mass consisting of many people, or even if it is you perceive "a many people" come be many plural individuals.

Except the "a lot of" is grammatically plural regardless of being singular in form; it's a synonym of "many". Therefore "a most people" can only ever before be plural. The an option between "there is" and also "there are" is therefore only under to whether conventional or unshened English is gift used.

"A lot of of" is singular in other interpretations of words "lot", such as at one auction or when drawing lots.


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· 3y
You need to enhance your verb (is/are) to "a lot." Why? due to the fact that you space using a linking verb (is/are), which needs to match the predicate nominative (a noun in the predicate).

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The factor you aren't corresponding to "people" (which is plural and also would need the many verb "are," if it to be the predicate nominative) is the "people" is the object of the preposition "of," which renders "of people" a preposition phrase. Preposition phrases act together modifiers (either adjectival or adverbial), so the verb is certainly not equivalent to the modifier. Nope, it's equivalent to "a lot," which way "many."

Now, if you are writing formally, many sources will tell you that "a lot" is informal language, and I would suggest transforming it come "many." Either method though, you need "are" since it matches if you to speak "many people" and also if you say "a many people" (because in the very first case, plenty of is one adjective, and also you are corresponding to the many "people," and also in the second case, "a lot" is plural, and also you space ignoring "of people" since it's a modifying phrase).